• Pointfive Kiosk, Tatton Park Biennial 2012, Jonathan Woodward, Steven Thorpe, Static, Deutsche Bank, Liverpool
    17.05.12

    Kiosk Details

    A selection of details in the Kiosk. Including solid brass angle 50 x 50 x 1500. Rebated mild steel plate 8 x 100 x 2830. Rebated mild steel angle 8 x 100 x 100 x 3050.


    Pointfive Kiosk, Tatton Park Biennial 2012, Jonathan Woodward, Steven Thorpe, Static, Deutsche Bank, Liverpool



    Pointfive Kiosk, Tatton Park Biennial 2012, Jonathan Woodward, Steven Thorpe, Static, Deutsche Bank, Liverpool



    Pointfive Kiosk, Tatton Park Biennial 2012, Jonathan Woodward, Steven Thorpe, Static, Deutsche Bank, Liverpool



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  • Pointfive Kiosk, Tatton Park Biennial 2012, Jonathan Woodward, Steven Thorpe, Static, Deutsche Bank, Liverpool
    17.05.12

    Kiosk

    The 3 meter cube situated within the grounds of Tatton Park, Knutsford performs as an information kiosk for the Tatton Park Biennial 2012.

    The facades of the cube are altered using a CNC router to make over 8000 perforations. The structure balances porosity and solidity, at times appearing transparent and others opaque.

    The Kiosk will hold an alien presence in the neo-classical stableyard for the next 5 months (until 30th September 2012) exchanging information with visitors about artworks placed around the parkland.

    Constructed from 18mm birch plywood, the surface is treated with an ebony stain making for a greater negation between solid and void. The exterior fabric determines a display of light onto the interior surfaces of the space, exhibiting a time particular cosmos of light and shadow.


    Pointfive Kiosk, Tatton Park Biennial 2012, Jonathan Woodward, Steven Thorpe, Static, Deutsche Bank, Liverpool



    Pointfive Kiosk, Tatton Park Biennial 2012, Jonathan Woodward, Steven Thorpe, Static, Deutsche Bank, Liverpool



    Pointfive Kiosk, Tatton Park Biennial 2012, Jonathan Woodward, Steven Thorpe, Static, Deutsche Bank, Liverpool



    Pointfive Kiosk, Tatton Park Biennial 2012, Jonathan Woodward, Steven Thorpe, Static, Deutsche Bank, Liverpool



    Pointfive Kiosk, Tatton Park Biennial 2012, Jonathan Woodward, Steven Thorpe, Static, Deutsche Bank, Liverpool



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  • Pointfive Kiosk
    20.04.12

    Aperture

    Concluding moments of pre build.

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  • 14.04.12

    Intermediate

    Some moments of construction. Some scale too.


    Pointfive Kiosk Tatton Park Biennial




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  • 14.04.12

    Week 2/2

    Pre-Build week 2 became a pivotal time for the final preparations of the construction components of the kiosk. The help of many hands was needed and much appreciated.

    A summary of the week;


    Monday. Box seats finished and wrapped for transportation. Aperture composed but unable to test. as it remained horizontal. Ramp hinges tested and working.


    Tuesday. Attempted to drill 22mm holes in steel for the last time. Resorted to using M16 stainless steel bolts as pillar drill begins to give up. Ordered aluminium angles for ramp stability/ durability. 


    Wednesday. Ramp assembled and requiring 2 mild steel angles acting as ribs to conclude rigidity. Floor assembled with 70mm angle brackets for easy on/off install, no screws on show. All holes drilled in steel. A-board feet attached, looking really good.


    Thursday. Soffit/ Roof assembled with 50mm angle brackets, no screws on show. Donations box (cylinder) footing ready for install. Final spray of steel. Steel put in place for put together.


    Friday. Steel frame up. First facade piece in place with an unbelievable degree of accuracy thanks to the steel fabricators and timber machinists. 



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  • 01.04.12

    Week 1/2

    This week Pointfive will be preparing materials, fabricating metal components and testing areas of the Kiosk. The control of the designer/maker will undoubtably arise, with our commitments/ compromises documented throughout the week.


    Summary of week;


    Monday. Steel arrives. Structural bolts needed/ ordered.

    Tuesday. Pointfive became 'men in ven'. All timber moved from Bootle to Static. Staining of timber started. Everything looking great! Tired.

    Wednesday. The majority of the staining done. A board assembled and glued. Tried to drill 22mm holes, failed, moving to 16mm stainless bolts. Decided on keeping ply layers exposed.

    Thursday. Started to spray steel. Finishing staining. Box seats assembled and glued.

    Friday. Staining finished. Box seats now have doors and floors. Sanded everything. Steel holes at 12mm, 8mm more to go....


    Pointfive Workshop



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  • Pointfive Question and Answer Interview Chris Grey Harry Conway
    20.03.12

    Q / A

    An interview with Chris Grey and Harry Conway of the Liverpool School of Art and Design.


    Q / When developing a project, do you prefer to develop the work in the medium of models or drawings? 


    .5 / We work through the design process typically from a point of investigation, usually regarding a material or idea of social experience. We begin with rough sketches of material composition, how they will work at different scales and spatially. We usually then move to a rough scale model to identify space and proportion with the instinct of what material dimension we have identified previously. After the first model a series of precise 2 dimensional drawings are made to support the spatial composition, possibly working in parallel to the creation of a new model benefiting from a more resolved composure of details.



    Q / In your opinion, what is it about your medium of representation that helps you to convey your projects? 


    .5 / On the most part we curate the representation of our projects to deliver them to non-architects. We have proposed projects to a real spectrum of clients and as a practice operating in the composition of space we are required to show them in 3 dimensions. The ability of the model to convey an idea almost immediately and instinctively also aids its purpose in client meetings that are often short in duration. 



    Q / Do you consider the amount of projects undertaken to be more important than the successfulness of just one project? 


    .5 / As Pointfive was established to emerge within 12 months, the time scale has encouraged focus to engage on a singular but relatively complex project. The importance of this project is not in monologue but more so an opportunity to take certain ideas to fruition, the current project remains the most important, but all the proposals converse around similar ideologies or ambitions.   



    Q / In each of your projects submitted to various competitions, do you try to build on your last submission, allowing your personal approaches and theories to be developed as a series of iterations, or do you prefer to treat each competition purely for what it is in a separate context, disconnected from your other work? Do you try to do both? 


    .5 / It is inevitable that each context provokes new ideas but we believe this provocation should still connect to our own histories and experiences. In each of our projects there is difference or newness but their ambitions wether they be technical or social remain somewhat connected in a more general idiom of development. 



    Q / In the future, how do see your design practice evolving? Will you remain focused on experimental architectural/interactive projects or move onto larger scale commercial projects? 


    .5 / The practice will remain acute, flexible and possibly interwoven back into education. The next conversation will be with Kingston University as we move the practice to London to make new connections with staff and students in order to have parallel the experience of practice and the ‘student’. The scale of the projects and the clients we work with have intentionally remained at a size that we could control the entire outcome. The inexorable constraints of time, ability and experience in our foreseeable situation will retain this scale and focus on the coherence of a small project rather than the contribution to something out of our immediate control.



    Q / What is your practice’s approach to sustainability? 


    .5 / As a practice we are ultimately educated in current material technologies and ideologies of certain thinkers but do not consolidate the notion of sustainability to any prescribed mode of operation. The most important aspect of our practice is to provide spaces and structures that have longevity in both experience and physicality. We make the upmost effort to source our materials and manufacturing to local businesses, as with the kiosk, all the materials and manufacturing have been sourced within 30 miles. This was not to fulfill a subscribed limit but rather a persistence to use the capacity of the locality.    



    Q / Do you have a set routine day by day, 9-5 or do you have a flexible attitude working more when needed?


    .5 / We typically work 9.30 - 6, either in the studio or out talking to clients or manufacturers. On the occasion of project deadlines or enthusiasm we will stay later or arrive earlier. There are always the times where evenings turn into mornings but fortunately it has been rare.  



    Q / What position do you take with your clients? 


    .5 / The clients we have worked for so far have all been in someway involved in the arts industry and fortunately forgiving of our demands or eccentricities. A usual conversation would be a update on design developments, from construction details to the color of the chairs. This occasionally includes drawings, models, photographs.



    Q / How does your practice promote itself? 


    .5 / There was an important stage at the inception of the practice to establish a presence online so if anyone was interested in contacting us there would be a basis to find that information. Apart from designing and feeding the website we have remained relatively quiet as we aim to concentrate our publicity onto our finalised and executed projects. As designers our capabilities should be judged on our outcome first and development/ research second. We focus intensely on having the Tatton Park Biennial Kiosk speak for and of the practice more than any sketch or formulaic theory. Once the Kiosk is built in context this will become our moment to publicize through the vehicle of the Biennial or as Pointfive through web based magazines and printed publications.



    Q / Your practice is involved with experimental artist projects. Is this an area you intend to pursue and do you think that not enough practices’ engage in this area of design? Why is it that you engage in such projects? 


    .5 / We engage with these projects primarily because of their scale and flexibility. The clients and participants also engage at a level that can influence and stimulate a project beyond its inherent value. The reason the larger practices rarely engage is the time demanded for a project of this type and the lack of financial backing would make it unviable. 



    Q / What do you consider to be the fundamental values of the architecture and experimental artworks you create? 


    .5 / The value is held in the experience of the individual. This is not something we can quantify or even qualify yet but is the inherent motivation behind our work.



    Q / Is there a practice in existence that you wish your practice to aspire to?


    .5 / It is very difficult to aspire to be someone else or something different other than your own response to the context in which you work. There are many practices that we certainly admire and can emotively find connections but they represent an entirely different situation to the one we possess and therefore develop and design in different manners.  



    Q / Is there a movement in architecture that you consider your practice to be a part of? 


    .5 / Pointfive is more interested in the continuity of history than subscribing to an idea lodged in a foreign context. We find the history of architecture and building far more interesting than attempting to find rhetoric in the comfort of being new.




    Conducted the morning of 19th March 2012. In Pointfive Studio, Liverpool.



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  • Pointfive Kiosk
    12.03.12

    Kiosk Fabrication

    The fabrication of the Kiosk has commenced. We were very excited to see the first 1525 x 3050 mm piece of the the kiosk completed. A total of 900 perforations were cut using a 2 axis CNC milling machine in just under 4 hours. This process will commence throughout the week to complete the remaining 7 panels and a sliding door.


    Pointfive Kiosk


    Pointfive Kiosk


    Pointfive Kiosk


    Pointfive Kiosk


    Pointfive Kiosk


     

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  • Curfew Tower Pointfive
    09.03.12

    Curfew Tower

    Pointfive have just completed an artist residency in the Curfew Tower, curated by Static Gallery, owned by Bill Drummond. The tower is located in Cushendall, Northern Ireland.


    The Brief explained by Static Gallery:

    The Curfew Tower 2012

    "Our idea for the 2012 Curfew Tower residency programme is to invite a range of disciplines (artists, architects, musicians, academics, curators, writers etc) who may stay from 1 day – 3 weeks (as in our experience a lot of invited residents can’t commit to over 1-2 weeks so this offers the possibility of short burst high intensity visits). We want to ask them to make a ‘field recording’ on a Tascam Multi-Track Cassette Recorder (or similar). Accompanying each recorder will be A User Manual. The recordings on tape will be collected in between each residency as each participant will be required to put it in a stamped self addressed envelope and send to Static guaranteed delivery. We will then edit and produce the record. The recording of a record (or cassette tape) of course also references Drummond’s own music industry history as well as providing a deliver mechanism for the ideas of the invited residents."


    Pointfive Curfew Tower 2012






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  • Tatton Park Biennial 2012 Kiosk Black Box
    20.02.12

    Production

    The 1:10 Kiosk model for Steel and Timber fabricators. This is the last model we assembled before the manufacturing process commenced last week. 


    Tatton Park Biennial 2012 Kiosk Black Box


    Tatton Park Biennial 2012 Kiosk Black Box




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  • soup kitchen pointfive
    16.01.12

    Soup

    The Soup Kitchen is a collaborative project with the Holy Apostles Soup Kitchen to curate a public space with free soup for the duration of the exhibition. 

    The architecture is based upon a simple composition of material which is altered when placed in different orientations within areas of light and shade.     

    The project looks to bring together different communities in the Manhattan area to join in the communal experience of a daily meal. The space is conceived as a refectory and assembly for public gathering. We have focused our investigation into establishing a domain to be for those both inside and outside the gallery context to share conversation over the most humble of meals.


    soup kitchen pointfive


    soup kitchen pointfive



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  • 15.12.11

    Sketches for Models

    Some sketches for the models in progress. Soup Kitchen and Folly.






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  • 15.12.11

    Resident

    Spaces for inhabitation. The conscious thought of making for dwelling. A future project for Static Gallery with links to other inhabitable art spaces in Europe.




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  • 15.12.11

    Elevation

    The facade is made for rhythm and to present the state of occupancy. Each inhabitant will be exposed to the landscape and the landscape of the architecture exposed to its inhabitant. 





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  • 23.11.11

    Viewing Mechanism

    To view is a precondition, but to perceive and behold through all the senses is contemplation on a renewed vista. A panorama of colour, embrace and a calming rhythm of change. 

    The human relation to the seasons is one that constitutes our daily rhythms, attire and often our thoughts. Our association with each season recalls different memories or the conscious images that define them. In any given image we contemplate the changes in our natural environment as they appear as a naive backdrop to an event that comes to define a certain atmosphere in time. It is in this spirit that contemplating on the sensorial changes of our environment becomes of great value for a sensibility to develop in an increasingly urbanised domain. 








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  • 23.11.11

    Detail Mechanism 1:5

    As a practice we continuously look to address moments of scale wether they be immense or intimate. We also consider how scale can be transmitted or in some cases altered. In this proposal we initiated a gesture that would connect the physical presence of a student to the structure through means of intervention. 


    \As a student enters the space it appears mostly in the shade, sheltered yet with controlled light to aid direction. An array of bench seating is fixed to the presence of a solid rammed earth wall that gives a relief and texture to the light that fall upon it. 


    As a slight weight is placed on the seats they pivot with a faint resistance as an internal mechanism is initiated. This mechanism in turn tightens a pulley system that runs axially through the structure. As the pulley system tightens a length of high tensile wire, a hinged aperture begins to open directly in front of the seat. A view is made physically through the detection of a presence. The expression on the outside of the building is sculptural and the new internal scale is completely renewed. The spaces occupied bring in light, but most importantly  gives an infinite vista to the student possessing the seat at that time. This process is reversed as the seat is returned to its upright position.











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  • 14.11.11

    Digitalis

    The artwork will operate with a cycle of moving images that occupy different screens at different times, altering the overall appearance of the installation. The films will be composed according to the colours or atmosphere they present to assemble a mosaic like formation that changes throughout a predetermined time frame.









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  • 07.11.11

    To see through

    To contemplate on the material and immaterial substance of the wall, its porosity and its confessional aura.






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  • 07.11.11

    Terminal Convention Art Fair

    Terminal Convention was an internationally significant art, film, music and discursive event. The project took place 17-27 March 2011, and is set in the former Cork International Airport, Ireland and Cork city centre music venues.  The Art Fair design examines notions of public and private space, fabrication, the architecture of the sale, VIP and temporary urban installations.




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  • 07.11.11

    Liverpool Seoul X.Change

    Liverpool Seoul X.Change examined relationships between language, media perceptions and spatial experimentation. What do the people of Liverpool, Uk think of Seoul, South Korea? What do the people of Seoul, South Korea think of Liverpool? How do these ideas and opinions form an abstract 3d terrain, documentary or image?



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